Adrenergic Blockers

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Chapter: Medicinal Chemistry : Adrenergic Blockers

Adrenergic blockers are also called as antiadrenergic drugs or sympatholytics. Adrenergic blocking agents prevent the response of effector organs to endogenous as well as exogenous adrenaline and noradrenaline.


Adrenergic Blockers


INTRODUCTION

Adrenergic blockers are also called as antiadrenergic drugs or sympatholytics. Adrenergic blocking agents prevent the response of effector organs to endogenous as well as exogenous adrenaline and noradrenaline. These drugs block the actions of adrenergic drugs at alpha (α) or beta (β) adrenergic receptors.

Many types of adrenergic antagonists are used and several of these are clinically useful in medicine, particularly in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Drugs that decrease the amount of norepinephrine released as a consequence of sympathetic nerve stimulation as well as drugs that inhibit sympathetic nervous activity by suppressing sympathetic outflow is also widely used in medications. Almost all of these agents are competitive antagonists in their interactions with either α or β adrenergic receptors, and one exception is phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible antagonist that binds covalently to α-adrenergic receptors. These are due to important structural differences among the various types of adrenergic receptors. Selective β1 antagonist drugs are used to act on the heart and selective β2 antagonist drugs are used to act on the respiratory system.


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