Intravenous additives

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Many medicines for parenteral administration are provided as concentrates or lyophilised powders. These require reconstitution and/or dilution followed by transfer to a device (such as a syringe or infusion bag) for administration to the patient.


Intravenous additives

 

Many medicines for parenteral administration are provided as concentrates or lyophilised powders. These require reconstitution and/or dilution followed by transfer to a device (such as a syringe or infusion bag) for administration to the patient. The need for pharmacy-based IV additive services was recognised in the Breckenridge report of 1976. However, studies in the north-west of England have shown that only 35% of medicines requiring aseptic manipulation are prepared by the hospital pharmacy department. Most CIVAS departments target high-risk areas for their services. These include the provision of various doses for paediatric patients, analgesics and antibiotics and also anaesthetic analgesic combinations for epidural infusion. Many hospitals also provide subcutaneous infusions of drug combinations used in palliative care, as well as prefilled syringes to support patient-controlled analgesia. They also provide antibiotic infusions in disposable infusion devices for domiciliary patients with cystic fibrosis or osteomyelitis. A Department of Health survey placed infusions of morphine, bupivacaine, desferrioxamine and three antibiotics into the top 10 aseptic products pro-duced by hospitals.

 

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